Biliion Dollar Plant Question

Plants do not have muscles BUT how do they move when they grow ?

give your answers below :smile:

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Here is a paper it’s introduction reads something like this
Roger Hangarter, of the Department of Biology at Indiana
University, developed the excellent Plants-In-Motion website (http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu, Figure 1). The
introductory page points out that “plants live on a different
time-scale from ours. Although not usually obvious in the
relatively hyperactive activities of humans, plants are in
constant motion as they develop, search for light and nutrients, avoid predators, exploit neighbors, and reproduce.”
To reveal the extent of plant movements, Hangarter has
produced 40 time-lapse movies. Topics include germination,
photomorphogenesis, tropisms, nastic movements, circadian responses, general growth, flowers, and cellular responses. Each section begins with an overview page that
provides background information about the topic. The page
for each movie includes more specific details about the
video, as well as information about how frequently images
were captured and the speed at which they are played back.
While narration would provide additional assistance in understanding what is being shown in each movie, it probably
would be difficult to fit descriptions to their speed. The
movies I watched ranged from 10 to 30 seconds in length.
The movies should convey to students of all ages that,
despite their apparent static nature, plants are quite active.
For example, growing bean seeds is a common exercise in
elementary classes. The video of bean leaf circadian movements would help children see the folding down of the
leaves at night (when they are not in the classroom), as well
as leaf motion during the day (Figure 2). I particularly
appreciated the videos of processes that normally cannot be
observed due to their long periodicity or because they are
happening in the dark or underground. For example, one
video shows corn seeds germinating in wet soil. Others
show seedlings growing in the dark or under lights of a
specific wavelength.
Plants-In-Motion includes extensive directions for making
time-lapse movies. These will be useful to instructors who
would like to capture plant movements not available on
Hangarter’s site, as well as students interested in making
their own movies, such as for science fair projects. Teachers
of younger students may be interested in the instructions
(found in the Plant Science Projects section of the site) for
making flipbooks from QuickTime movies. These books
would be an excellent way to assist students in understanding how time-lapse movies are made and what students are
seeing.
Some of Hangarter’s movies were used in the sLowlife
Virtual Exhibition from the Chicago Botanic Garden, which
is linked from his site (in the Plant Art section). The virtual
exhibit provides a more publicly accessible format and text
for the movies, and includes additional videos from other
individuals, as well as accompanying sounds

Go and read this paper it’s really amazing here is the link for you (PDF) Plant Movements Revealed

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Then what are the minerals for that they absorb .They kinda work like muscles

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https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://botanyprofessor.blogspot.com/2015/01/how-plants-do-everything-without-moving.html%3Fm%3D1&ved=2ahUKEwj3p_GGmM_jAhUDneAKHflsDRkQFjAJegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw10_IEihSGEIdwz3540cyU-&cshid=1564027427504

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No one knows . But what’s the proof plants have muscles

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they do not have muscles thats thequestion

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What is after all muscle? Why muscle contracts?
What in the muscle makes it to contract (and relax) ?!!

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Muscles have protein filaments in them which make them contract n relax. Do plants also have something similar ?

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Are you asking for a proof that they have or they don’t have?

But so they need to have the muscles to move? Read the paper I have sent…

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