Two different colors of Cat eyes

Two different colors of Cat eyes
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Take a look at eyes.
What is the behind this…codominance gene expression? …From Jaipur

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It is a case of Heterochromia iridis or odd eyed…

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Sir what is the odd eye? Why it happens? @SudhirVerma

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An odd-eyed cat is a cat with one blue eye and one eye either green, yellow, or brown. This is a feline form of complete heterochromia. The odd-eyed coloring is caused when either the dominant white gene (which masks any other color genes and turns a cat completely white) which is the gene responsibile for bicolour and prevents melanin granules from reaching one eye during development resulting in a cat with one blue eye and one green, yellow, or brown eye. The condition only rarely occurs in cats that lack both the dominant white and the white spotting gene.
Reference:

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But both the eye is coloured at last then? @Akshitha

Can you please rephrase the question as it is unclear?

see can you please elaborate the explanation and the reason for different eye colour as it is not that clear @Akshitha

Heterochromia is a condition in which the coloured part of the eye (iris) is multicoloured.In some cases, the colour of the iris in one eye might be different from that of the other eye. For eg, one eye is blue and another is brown.
This cat also shows heterochromia, ie, odd eyed colouring. Heterochromia is determined by the production and concentration of melanin. So the blue eye of the cat indicates a lack of melanin. This lack of melanin in one of the eyes is a dominant gene, and hence it masks other genes. This gene is responsible for the lack of melanin in one of the eyes as it prevents melanin from reaching the eye during development. So the eye with low levels of melanin are blue, while the eye with normal melanin content is green, yellow or brown. This condition maybe genetic or acquired.
@bivasnag

Is the colour of the eyes of a cat is controlled by different genes…? If not then why is it so that one eye has ‘lack of melanin’ dominant gene n the other eye do not have… ? Can we have 2 or 3 colours in same eye…?

Heterochromia can occur dud to a variety of reasons. Maybe from birth, a genetic condition or maybe over time. Most of thr cases are not due to genetic mutation…an example of genetically mutated heterochromia is the Waardenburg syndrome, but this may affecr several parts of the body and not just the eye and is also associated with hearing loss. If an eye gets pigment at all, it’s due to melanocytes - special cells that pump out the pigment melanin. A lot of melanocytes means a brown eye. A few means green or hazel. Very few means a blue eye. The melanocytes don’t develop in the emerging eyes, though. They travel to the eyes. They travel because they’re told to travel from a variety of complicated sources, any of which can fail. If the melanocytes from one eye or one part of an eye don’t get told to travel due to damage to the brain or some kind of delay in the signal, they don’t go anywhere, leaving one eye lightly pigmented. Alternately, they can travel to an eye but get destroyed or damaged one site. This again results in different pigmentation. Rather than genes, it is the amount of melanin secreted by the melanocytes in each eye.

Reference:


https://genetics.thetech.org/ask-a-geneticist/heterochromia

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